REVIEWED
2/2/03

STORY



LOOK

Panic Room
Director: David Fincher
Year: 2002
TRT: 1:52


Here's opinion for you. Initial reviews all mentioned how cool the opening credit sequence for this movie was. Being a fan of Fincher, I went to the theater and saw this film upon release, expecting some pretty big things considering how the opening sequences for se7en and Fight Club play out. But this was amazingly lame in comparison. I still wonder wtf people thought was so special about it. Fortunately the rest of the movie doesn't follow suit. I have to say I enjoyed it much more this time around (I think a wozzle of beers helped a bit, but hey). The only big problem I had with it initially is kind of a lame plot device involving the daughter, but it wasn't as annoying this time around, or I just ignored it better.

There is a good amount of true suspense in this film, and has some pretty well-developed characters. This allows a pretty decent, believable progression of events. There are very few people in the movie, operating in relatively small confines, considering the whole movie takes place in a 4-story Brownstone apartment or whatever the hell they were calling it. So it really focuses on the people involved in the story, with great performances by all the major players (particularly by Jared Leto as the snubbed rich kid turned thief). This movie is pretty conventional in its telling, and as with all Fincher films looks great. It has an "R" rating for language and a couple of bloody fight/gunshot sequences, but overall is a pretty slick little cat and mouse tale.

Great Scene: There is a prolonged "shot" near the beginning that integrates some CG beautifully while floating through the entire house so you can see what exactly the situation is.

DVD Notes: Pretty run-of-the-mill DVD by Columbia with a teaser trailer and some brief bios of the major players. The minimal extras at least play out in a cool manner. Does this make the movie any better? Not really. I couldn't give a flying rat's ass about "animated" menus. Too bad, a commentary on this one could have been pretty good.